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Test Prep and Study Guide Resources

What is the OTA National Board Exam?

The National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT® ) is the national certification body for occupational therapy professionals in the United States. T Currently, 50 states, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia require NBCOT initial certification for occupational therapy state regulation (e.g., licensing) (from https://www.nbcot.org/Students/get-certified)

The National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) is the only recognized organization that provides certification for all occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants within the United States. There are two certification credentials available – the Occupational Therapist Registered (OTR) or the Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Certification exams are required for both credentials, as well as other educational and fieldwork requirements that must be met. The OTR and COTA exams are designed to assess the knowledge and skills required for entry level practice in the field of occupational therapy. Passing the exams does not constitute state licensing, but is one aspect of receiving a state license to practice within the field of occupational therapy. (from https://www.tests.com/Occupational-Therapist-Testing)

NSCC Resources

This ebook is available for NSCC students to use. You will need your MyNorthShore username and password to access it. 

Online Resources

Most online review materials for the OTA National Board Exam are part of paid services - you can purchase books, flashcards, or online review materials and practice tests; however many of these paid services also offer some free materials or a free trial period that you can use without or before making a purchase. Be careful to read the fine print regarding cost and free trial periods before ever giving a company your credit card information.