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Hawthorne at Salem

Life & Times

Novels

Welcome to the Novel Section

Title page of 1878 edition of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
Title page of 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter (courtesy of James R. Osgood and Co.)
 
Hawthorne’s first novel was nearly lost to the world; if Hawthorne had had his way, it would have vanished. He tried to destroy all copies of the book, just as he destroyed drafts of all his fiction and early correspondence. Hawthorne’s first novel, entitled Fanshawe: A Tale was published anonymously by the Boston firm Marsh and Capen in 1828. The setting is a college, not unlike Bowdoin, and the story focuses on the ambition and romance of its loner hero, Fanshawe. In her biography, Hawthorne: A Life, Brenda Wineapple notes that Fanshawe “anticipates Hawthorne’s ethereal loners, the passive clergyman Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter and the half-baked poet Miles Coverdale in The Blithedale Romance (65).
 

After receiving favorable reviews of short stories published in various magazines and in collections, Hawthorne still was struggling financially and unable to support himself and his family through his writing in the early 1840s. In 1846 he accepted a political appointment as Surveyor of the Port at the Salem Custom House, but while he now had a salary, the stultifying atmosphere at the Custom House kept him from doing much writing. A change in the political administration led to his firing from his Custom House position in the summer of 1849, at about the same time of the death of his mother. Perhaps it was the combination of these two events that caused the creative burst shortly thereafter that resulted in the novel The Scarlet Letter, a tale of the public shame of the adulteress, Hester Prynne, the tortured guilt of her lover, the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale, and the vengeful prying of Hester’s husband, Roger Chillingworth, a name he takes when he arrives in Boston to disguise his identity when he discovers his wife’s infidelity. The novel, published in 1850, was admired by contemporaries and called by some later critics the first truly American novel.

The creative flood unleashed by The Scarlet Letter produced two more novels in quick succession: The House of the Seven Gables in 1851 and The Blithedale Romance in 1852. The House of the Seven Gables is set in the present, not the past as is The Scarlet Letter, but the past plagues the characters of this novel as a curse handed down from the days of the witchcraft trials, hangs over the Pyncheon family who reside in the house of the title. In The Blithedale Romance, published in 1852, was inspired by Hawthorne’s participation in Brook Farm, a utopian community outside Boston, although in the preface to that novel Hawthorne refutes any direct connection between his life at Brook Farm and the events of the novel. His novel was not, he asserted, meant to stake out a position on socialism. In his biography entitled Nathaniel Hawthorne in His Times, James R. Mellow notes that in this novel Hawthorne “dispensed with much of the heavy machinery of allegory that had encumbered a good deal of his earlier fiction. And, despite the trafficking in spiritualism and séances, there are fewer Gothic devices—no ancestral portraits, no family curses—in The Blithedale Romance” (393). He also observes that “at the moment when Melville (with Hawthorne as exemplar) was becoming openly allegorical, Hawthorne [was] pursuing the fictional possibilities of the actual” (393).

The last novel that Hawthorne completed was The Marble Faun, written while he was in Italy and published first in England under the title Transformation in 1860. Hawthorne draws on his friendship with the American sculptors William Wetmore Story, Louisa Lander, and Harriet Hosmer, all of whom Hawthorne and his wife met while living in Italy, for character portrayals in this novel. The book was favorably reviewed but left some readers bewildered by its uncertain ending. Wineapple says, “Like Rome, then, The Marble Faun is a series of fragments…,” and she adds, “Plotline and character and rumination and guidebook are shored against one another—not just like an unfinished picture but also like the body parts strewn throughout the novel, statues without noses skulls, a model of Hilda’s hand, and the headless Venus discovered in the Campagna” (327).

Three unfinished novels by Hawthorne were published posthumously: Septimius Felton in 1972, The Dolliver Romance in 1876, and Dr. Grimshawe’s Secret in 1883.

Original Documents to the Novels of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Fanshaw

Hawthorne, Nathaniel.  <I>Fanshawe:  A Tale.</I>
Boston:  Marsh & Capen, 1828.
Gift: Friends of the Library
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. Fanshawe: A Tale. Boston: Marsh & Capen, 1828. Gift: Friends of the Library 
Fanshawe, Hawthorne's first novel, is also the earliest college novel written in America. Hawthorne based his fictional "Harley College" on Bowdoin. Published anonymously and subsequently disavowed by the author, Hawthorne attempted to suppress its distribution (his friend Horatio Bridge burned his copy at Hawthorne's request). all text copyright Bowdoin College, 2009.  (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
Title page of <i>Fanshawe</i>, Hawthorne's first novel (Marsh & Capen, 1828)
Title page of Fanshawe, Hawthorne's first novel (Marsh & Capen, 1828)
According to the Bowdoin College Library record for this work, Fanshaweis "the earliest novel written in America, and Hawthorne based his fictional 'Harley College' on Bowdoin. Published anonymously and disavowed by the author, Hawthorne attempted to suppress its distribution (his friend Horatio Bridge burned his copy at Hawthorne's request)." (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)

The Scarlet Letter

Title page of 1850 edition of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
Title page of 1850 edition of The Scarlet Letter
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

House of the Seven Gables

Illustration depicting Clifford blowing soap-bubbles (cf. chapter XI \"The Arched Window\") from frontispiece to <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
Illustration depicting Clifford blowing soap-bubbles (cf. chapter XI "The Arched Window") from frontispiece to The House of the Seven Gables published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
from the Illustrated Library Edition, The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image, two volumes in one  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)

The Blithedale Romance

Masthead of <i>Concord Freeman</i> newspaper, July 11, 1845
Masthead of Concord Freeman newspaper, July 11, 1845
This issue of the Concord Freeman contains the announcement of the suicide drowning of Martha Hunt (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Announcement of suicide drowning of Martha Hunt from <i>Concord Freeman</i>, July 11, 1845
Announcement of suicide drowning of Martha Hunt from Concord Freeman, July 11, 1845
 (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Cover of <I>The Dial</I> July, 1843
Cover of The Dial July, 1843
 (courtesy of Fruitlands Museum)
First page of \"The Great Lawsuit, Man vs. Men/Woman vs. Women,\" by Margaret Fuller, July 1843 in <I>The Dial</I>
First page of "The Great Lawsuit, Man vs. Men/Woman vs. Women," by Margaret Fuller, July 1843 in The Dial
 (courtesy of Fruitlands Museum)
Masthead of <i>Concord Freeman</i> newspaper, July 11, 1845
Masthead of Concord Freeman newspaper, July 11, 1845
This issue of the Concord Freeman contains the announcement of the suicide drowning of Martha Hunt (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Announcement of suicide drowning of Martha Hunt from <i>Concord Freeman</i>, July 11, 1845
Announcement of suicide drowning of Martha Hunt from Concord Freeman, July 11, 1845
 (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Masthead of <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845 which contains the obituary of Martha Hunt
Masthead of The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845 which contains the obituary of Martha Hunt 
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (1) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (1) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845 
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (2) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (2) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (3) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (3) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (4) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (4) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (5) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (5) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (6) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (6) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (7) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (7) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (8) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (8) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (9) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (9) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (10) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (10) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (11) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (11) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)
Obituary (12) for Martha Hunt from <i>The Concord Freeman</i>vol. XI from August 1, 1845
Obituary (12) for Martha Hunt from The Concord Freemanvol. XI from August 1, 1845
Hawthorne was living at the Old Manse when he was called to help look for Martha Hunt, a woman who drowned in the Concord River. This event likely inspired the drowning scene in The Blithedale Romance. (courtesy of Concord Free Public Library)

The Marble Faun


Fig 13. Illustrated title page. From "The Marble Faun" (Cambridge, Mass: Riverside Press, 1883). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA

Images Related to the Novels of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Fanshawe

Slate Gravestone for Nathanael Mather, 1688, Charter Street Burial Ground, Salem.
Slate Gravestone for Nathanael Mather, 1688, Charter Street Burial Ground, Salem.
An Aged person / that had seen but / Nineteen Winters / in the World.Hawthorne, a frequent visitor to Salem's Charter Street burial ground, used the epitaph for Nathanael Mather, the son of Rev. Increase Mather,in his story Fanshawe. Historian Sidney Perley wrote the following about Mather: “Nathaniel Mather was son of Rev. Increase and Maria Mather of Boston, where he was born July 6, 1669. His father was president of Harvard College; and two of his brothers were Reverends Cotton and Samuel Mather. He entered Harvard at the age of twelve, and took his first degree at the age of sixteen, when he gave a Hebrew oration, so great a scholar had he become at that tender age. His acquaintance with general literature and science of those times was extraordinary; and he excelled in mathematics, classics and theology. He was a hard student and a good scholar, but too close application, probably without relaxation, produced ill health. At the age of fourteen, he dedicated himself to God. His dedication consisted of devotion to prayer for personal sanctity, and he deliberated so much and so seriously that had became morbid and melancholy. He had taken his second degree at college just before his death. He had contracted ill habits of posture of body, which, persisted in, produced effects which made him appear like an old man. He died in Salem Oct. 17, 1688, at the age of nineteen, and was buried in the Charter Street burying ground, where his gravestone still stands. It is said that his brother Cotton wrote the epitaph upon it….“ (Sidney Perley, The History of Salem, Massachusetts, Vol. 3, pp. 231-32.)  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)

The Scarlet Letter

 

  • \"They were rough-looking desperadoes\"
    "They were rough-looking desperadoes"
    p. 260 from The Scarlet Letter illustrated by Hugh Thomson (Methuen 1920) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"They were rough-looking desperadoes\"
    "They were rough-looking desperadoes"
    Original watercolor illustrations by Hugh Thomson for The Scarlet Letter(1920 Methuen edition) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"With purpose to snatch a kiss\"
    "With purpose to snatch a kiss"
    p. 274 from The Scarlet Letter illustrated by Hugh Thomson (Methuen 1920) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"With purpose to snatch a kiss\"
    "With purpose to snatch a kiss" 
    Original watercolor illustrations by Hugh Thomson for The Scarlet Letter(1920 Methuen edition) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"Hester at the foot of the scaffold\"
    "Hester at the foot of the scaffold"
    p. 276 from The Scarlet Letter illustrated by Hugh Thomson (Methuen 1920) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    Hester on the Scaffold
    Hester on the Scaffold
    This image appears in the January 1991 edition of the Essex Institute Historical Collection, vol. 127, no. 1. It is a reprint of the illustration by Mary Hallock Foote from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by James R. Osgood. Dr. Rita Gollin, author of the article in the EIHCentitled "The Scarlet Letter" which features this image, notes that "[w]hile Foote was not the first to illustrate the novel, her portraits of Hester are unusual in their reality, dense detail, and centrality to the composition" (17). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Fig. 2. \"The Interview.\" Illustration by F.O.C. Darley. 
From <I>The Scarlet Letter</I> (Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1892), opposite p. 96.
    Fig. 2. "The Interview." Illustration by F.O.C. Darley. From The Scarlet Letter (Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1892), opposite p. 96. 
    "Darley augments Hawthorne's text with such details as the chain on the wall and Hester's lavish dress." caption on image opposite p. 96. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Pearl and <i>The Scarlet Letter</i>
    Pearl and The Scarlet Letter
    Fig. 3. "Pearl and the Scarlet Letter". Wood engraving by George M. Richards. From "The Scarlet Letter" (New York: Macmillan, 1927). Sentimentally elaborating on Hawthorne's text. Richards presents a cozy room with a sampler on the wall, balls of yarn in a basket, and a hooked rug on the floor, in which a slender Hester with downcast eyes covers her scarlet letter while a smiling Pearl with flowers in both hands gracefully dances before her. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Arthur Dimmesdale
    Arthur Dimmesdale
    Fig. 4. Wood engraving by Barry Moser for the Pennyroyal Press from the January 1991 edition of the Essex Institute Historical Collection, vol. 127, no. 1; originally printed in 1984 edition of The Scarlet Letter(New York: Harcourt Brace and Jovanovich, 1984)Referring to the image in the 1984 HBJ edition, Dr. Rita Gollin, author of the essay "The Scarlet Letter," points out that "Mosler's images play an active interpretive role in this edition, particularly this final image showing Arthur Dimmesdale with his eyes downcast and the scar of an "A" clearly visible on his chest" (28). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Title page of 1878 edition of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Title page of 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter
    Early illustrated edition of The Scarlet Letter published in Boston by James R. Osgood and Company, formerly Ticknor, Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co. (courtesy of James R. Osgood and Co.)
    Illustration of the Custom House from early edition of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Illustration of the Custom House from early edition of The Scarlet Letter 
    From first page of "The Custom-House" chapter in the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published in 1878 by James R. Osgood and Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony (1) (courtesy of James R. Osgood and Co.)
    The Prison Door from \"The Custom-House\" chapter of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Prison Door from "The Custom-House" chapter of The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston.Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (49) 
    \"She was led back to Prison\" from chapter entitled \"The Recognition\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "She was led back to Prison" from chapter entitled "The Recognition" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (78) 
    \"The Eyes of the Wrinkled Scholar Glowed\" from chapter entitled \"The Interview\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "The Eyes of the Wrinkled Scholar Glowed" from chapter entitled "The Interview" of The Scarlet Letter
    Chillingworth is called to prison cell as healer to aid Hester and her ailing Pearl in this illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letterpublished by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (87)  
    The Lonesome Dwelling from chapter entitled \"Hester at Her Needle\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Lonesome Dwelling from chapter entitled "Hester at Her Needle" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (93) 
    Lonely Footsteps from chapter entitled \"Hester at Her Needle\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Lonely Footsteps from chapter entitled "Hester at Her Needle" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (99) 
    A Touch of Pearl's Baby-Hand from the chapter entitled \"Pearl\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    A Touch of Pearl's Baby-Hand from the chapter entitled "Pearl" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration of Hester and her baby Pearl from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (113) 
    Vignette on first page of Chapter 7, \"The Governor's Hall\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Vignette on first page of Chapter 7, "The Governor's Hall" of The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (118) 
    The Governor's Breastplate from chapter entitled \"The Governor's Hall\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Governor's Breastplate from chapter entitled "The Governor's Hall" of The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (125) 
    \"Look thou to it! I will not lose the child!\" from chapter entitled \"The Elf-child and the Minister\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "Look thou to it! I will not lose the child!" from chapter entitled "The Elf-child and the Minister" of The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (135) 
    The Minister and Leech from chapter entitled \"The Leech\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Minister and Leech from chapter entitled "The Leech" of The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (148) 
    The Leech and his Patient from the chapter of the same name in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Leech and his Patient from the chapter of the same name in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (165) 
    The Virgins of the Church from chapter entitled \"The Interior of a Heart\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Virgins of the Church from chapter entitled "The Interior of a Heart" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (172) 
    \"They stood in the noon of that strange splendor\" from chapter entitled \"The Minister's Vigil\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "They stood in the noon of that strange splendor" from chapter entitled "The Minister's Vigil" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (185) 
    Hester in the House of Mourning from chapter entitled \"Another View of Hester\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Hester in the House of Mourning from chapter entitled "Another View of Hester" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (185) (195) 
    Mandrake from chapter entitled \"Hester and the Physician\" in<I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Mandrake from chapter entitled "Hester and the Physician" inThe Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (211) 
    \"He gathered herbs here and there\" from chapter entitled \"Hester and Pearl\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "He gathered herbs here and there" from chapter entitled "Hester and Pearl" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (213) 
    Pearl on the Sea-Shore from chapter entitled \"Hester and Pearl\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Pearl on the Sea-Shore from chapter entitled "Hester and Pearl" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (217) 
    \"Wilt thou yet forgive me?\"from chapter entitled \"The Pastor and His Parishoner\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "Wilt thou yet forgive me?"from chapter entitled "The Pastor and His Parishoner" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (237) 
    A Gleam of Sunshine from chapter entitled \"A Flood of Sunshine\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    A Gleam of Sunshine from chapter entitled "A Flood of Sunshine" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from Chapter "A Flood of Sunshine" from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (249) 
    The Child at the Brook-side from the chapter of the same name in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    The Child at the Brook-side from the chapter of the same name in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (257) 
    Chillingworth,--\"Smile with a sinister meaning\" from chapter entitled \"The New England Holiday\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Chillingworth,--"Smile with a sinister meaning" from chapter entitled "The New England Holiday" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (287)  
    New England Worthies from chapter entitled \"The Procession\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    New England Worthies from chapter entitled "The Procession" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (289)  
    \"Shall we not meet again?\" from chapter entitled \"The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    "Shall we not meet again?" from chapter entitled "The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (311)  
    Hester's Return from chapter entitled \"The Conclusion\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Hester's Return from chapter entitled "The Conclusion" in The Scarlet Letter
    Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (320)  

     
  • Posters

    Poster from 1965 film version of The Scarlet Letter 
    Poster advertising 1934 film version of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I> directed by Robert Vignola.
    Poster advertising 1934 film version of The Scarlet Letter directed by Robert Vignola.
    This poster,owned by Peter Blatty, was exhibited at the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the publication of The Scarlet Letter at the Salem Custom House. The film was shot in Salem's Pioneer Village and Sherman Oaks, CA, and starred Colleen Moore. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

 

  • Paintings
    Illustration from painting of <i>The Scarlet Letter</i> by W.L. Taylor in 1912 for <i>Ladies' Home Journal</i>
    Illustration from painting of The Scarlet Letter by W.L. Taylor in 1912 for Ladies' Home Journal 
    Printed in the March, 1923 edition of Ladies' Home Journal (courtesy of the Meredith Corp. Publishing, and the Ladies’ Home Journal )

     
  • The Custom House
    Exterior of the Salem Custom House, 2000
    Exterior of the Salem Custom House, 2000
    Constructed in 1819, the Salem Custom House is a superb example of American Federalist public architecture. Hawthorne worked here as surveyor of the port from 1846-1849; import duties collected here helped finance the federal government. Constructed on ground where the George Crowninshield house once stood, the Salem Custom house, says Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. in Architecture of Salem, "may be entered through a beautifully adorned front central doorway serviced by a sweeping flight of granite steps. Combining delicate restraint and rich detail in the best tradition of Salem Federal architecture are the balustraded front entrance, with its four attenuated Ionic composite columns and fully developed entablature, and the modified Palladian window above which the porch column entablature elements are repeated. Perched high on the roof balustrade rests, in Hawthorne's words, 'an enormous [gilded] specimen of the American eagle, with outspread wings, a shield before her breast, ...a bunch of intermingled thuinderbolts and barbed arrows in each claw....' Surmounting the hipped roof, with its tall brick chimneys, is an octagonal Italianate cupola that dates from alterations (mostly interior) made in 1853/4. A three-story bonded warehouse ell is attached to the rear. Although the construction of the Custom House occurred several years after Samuel McIntire's death, it shows McIntire's influence, perhaps in large part because four of his contemporaries--nephew Joseph McIntire, Jr., David Lord, Joseph Edwards, and Joseph True--are known to have labored on the building. Perley Putnam (1778-1864) of Salem supervised construction" (58).  (photography by Aaron Toleos)
    The Salem Custom House, c. 1990
    The Salem Custom House, c. 1990
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    The Custom House Eagle, Salem, MA
    The Custom House Eagle, Salem, MA
    Photograph taken in June, 1997 (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    The eagle which sits on top of the Salem Custom House was sculpted by Joseph True.
    The eagle which sits on top of the Salem Custom House was sculpted by Joseph True.
     (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
    Nathaniel Hawthorne's Office in the Salem Custom House
    Nathaniel Hawthorne's Office in the Salem Custom House
     (photography by Terri Whitney)
    Hawthorne's Office in the Salem Custom House
    Hawthorne's Office in the Salem Custom House
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Photograph of Nathaniel Hawthorne from a daguerreotype,1848(?)
    Photograph of Nathaniel Hawthorne from a daguerreotype,1848(?)
    This image was made during the period when he served as surveyor at the Salem Custom House and may have been done by John Adams Whipple, Boston.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

     
  • 14 Mall St

    Sign on 14 Mall St., the house where Hawthorne wrote The Scarlet Letter
    14 Mall Street in 2001
    14 Mall Street in 2001
    Hawthorne wrote The Scarlet Letter in this house. 
    14 Mall Street in Salem
    14 Mall Street in Salem
    Hawthorne wrote The Scarlet Letter while living in this house. 
    Parlor on second floor of 14 Mall Street in Salem
    Parlor on second floor of 14 Mall Street in Salem
    Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote The Scarlet Letter in this house. 
    Postcard c. 1907 with picture of 14 Mall St., Salem
    Postcard c. 1907 with picture of 14 Mall St., Salem
    Hawthorne lived in this house when he wrote The Scarlet Letter in 1849. 

     
  • Objects and places related to Hester
    Gloves, 1640-60
    Gloves, 1640-60
    An example of the type of embroidery Hester would have done. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    The Ward House Great Room
    The Ward House Great Room
    An interior typical of the room in which Hester Prynne met with the Governor and ministers. 
    Elizabeth Pain Gravestone, 1704.
    Elizabeth Pain Gravestone, 1704.
    The Elizabeth Pain gravestone, King's Chapel, Boston. Local tradition holds that Elizabeth Pain was the prototype for Hester Prynne in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.
    King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston
    King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston
    The Elizabeth Pain gravestone is located in King's Chapel, Boston. Local tradition holds that Elizabeth Pain was the prototype for Hester Prynne in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston
    King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston
    The Elizabeth Pain gravestone is located in King's Chapel, Boston. Local tradition holds that Elizabeth Pain was the prototype for Hester Prynne in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    King's Chapel, Boston
    King's Chapel, Boston
    The Elizabeth Pain gravestone is located in King's Chapel, Boston. Local tradition holds that Elizabeth Pain was the prototype for Hester Prynne in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)

     
  • William Bradstreet
    Governor Simon Bradstreet House, Salem
from Sidney Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
    Governor Simon Bradstreet House, Salem from Sidney Perley's History of Salem 
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Portrait of Governor Simon Bradstreet
from Sidney Perley's <I>History of Salem, Massachusetts </I>
    Portrait of Governor Simon Bradstreet from Sidney Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts 
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Tomb of Simon Bradstreet, Charter Street Burial Ground, Salem.
    Tomb of Simon Bradstreet, Charter Street Burial Ground, Salem.
    The Tomb of Simon Bradstreet, a Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony and the husband of Puritan poet Anne [Dudley] Bradstreet.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

     
  • Film versions
    Publicity photograph from the 1926 silent film version of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I> starring Lillian Gish as Hester Prynne and Lars Hanson as Arthur Dimmesdale
    Publicity photograph from the 1926 silent film version of The Scarlet Letter starring Lillian Gish as Hester Prynne and Lars Hanson as Arthur Dimmesdale
    The 1926 silent film version of The Scarlet Letter by the Swedish director Victor Seastrom (Victor Sjostrom)starred Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Other members of the cast included: Henry B. Walthall, Karl Dane, Marcelle Corday, William H. Tooker, Fred Herzog, Jules Cowles, Mary Hawes, Joyce Coad, James A. Marcus, Nora Cecil, Dorothy Gray, Margaret Mann, Polly Moran. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, the film was based on an adaptation of the novel by Frances Marion. Set design was by Cedric Gibbons and Sidney Ullman, and costume design by Max Ree. Cinematography was by Hendrik Sartov and editing by Hugh Wynn. This was Gish's second film in a five film contract with MGM. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    The 1926 silent film version of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I> by the Swedish director Victor Seastrom (Victor Sjostrom)
    The 1926 silent film version of The Scarlet Letter by the Swedish director Victor Seastrom (Victor Sjostrom) 
    Starred Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Other members of the cast included: Henry B. Walthall, Karl Dane, Marcelle Corday, William H. Tooker, Fred Herzog, Jules Cowles, Mary Hawes, Joyce Coad, James A. Marcus, Nora Cecil, Dorothy Gray, Margaret Mann, Polly Moran.A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, the film was based on an adaptation of the novel by Frances Marion. Set design was by Cedric Gibbons and Sidney Ullman, and costume design by Max Ree. Cinematography was by Hendrik Sartov and editing by Hugh Wynn. This was Gish's second film in a five film contract with MGM.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Pearl (Joyce Coad), Hester Prynne (Lillian Gish)and the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale (Lars Hanson)in the final scene of the silent version of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
    Pearl (Joyce Coad), Hester Prynne (Lillian Gish)and the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale (Lars Hanson)in the final scene of the silent version of The Scarlet Letter
    The 1926 silent film version of The Scarlet Letter by the Swedish director Victor Seastrom (Victor Sjostrom)starred Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Other members of the cast included: Henry B. Walthall, Karl Dane, Marcelle Corday, William H. Tooker, Fred Herzog, Jules Cowles, Mary Hawes, Joyce Coad, James A. Marcus, Nora Cecil, Dorothy Gray, Margaret Mann, Polly Moran.A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, the film was based on an adaptation of the novel by Frances Marion. Set design was by Cedric Gibbons and Sidney Ullman, and costume design by Max Ree. Cinematography was by Hendrik Sartov and editing by Hugh Wynn. This was Gish's second film in a five film contract with MGM.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Part of the cast and crew of  the silent film version of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I> in 1926
    Part of the cast and crew of the silent film version of The Scarlet Letter in 1926 
    Victor Seastrom,the Swedish director of the film,is seated on the ground in this photo taken of the cast in North Hollywood. Lillian Gish, star of this feature, is seated on his right, and on the other side is Lars Hanson. Other members of the cast included: Henry B. Walthall, Karl Dane, Marcelle Corday, William H. Tooker, Fred Herzog, Jules Cowles, Mary Hawes, Joyce Coad, James A. Marcus, Nora Cecil, Dorothy Gray, Margaret Mann, Polly Moran.A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, the film was based on an adaptation of the novel by Frances Marion. Set design was by Cedric Gibbons and Sidney Ullman, and costume design by Max Ree. Cinematography was by Hendrik Sartov and editing by Hugh Wynn. This was Gish's second film in a five film contract with MGM.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Hester on the Scaffold from the 1926 silent film version starring Lillian Gish/Watch <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>(1926) on TCM
    Hester on the Scaffold from the 1926 silent film version starring Lillian Gish/Watch The Scarlet Letter(1926) on TCM
    The 1926 silent film version of The Scarlet Letter by the Swedish director Victor Seastrom (Victor Sjostrom)starred Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Other members of the cast included: Henry B. Walthall, Karl Dane, Marcelle Corday, William H. Tooker, Fred Herzog, Jules Cowles, Mary Hawes, Joyce Coad, James A. Marcus, Nora Cecil, Dorothy Gray, Margaret Mann, Polly Moran.A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, the film was based on an adaptation of the novel by Frances Marion. Set design was by Cedric Gibbons and Sidney Ullman, and costume design by Max Ree. Cinematography was by Hendrik Sartov and editing by Hugh Wynn. This was Gish's second film in a five film contract with MGM.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

The House of the Seven Gables

  • Book Covers and Illustrations:
    Cover of <i>The House of the Seven Gables </i>with illustrations by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
    Cover of The House of the Seven Gables with illustrations by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    Title page of volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    Title page of volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gablesillustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"A little withdrawn from the line of the street\" (p. 12)<p>Frontispiece of volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)</p>
    "A little withdrawn from the line of the street" (p. 12)

    Frontispiece of volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gablesillustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)


    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    List of illustrations by Edith and Mildred Cowles in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    List of illustrations by Edith and Mildred Cowles in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"The Old Pyncheon Family\" (p. 1) from volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    "The Old Pyncheon Family" (p. 1) from volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"Can it have been an early lover?\" (p. 48) from volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    "Can it have been an early lover?" (p. 48) from volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"A square and sturdy little urchin\" (p. 80) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    "A square and sturdy little urchin" (p. 80) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"Considered themselves...her patrons and superiors\" (p. 86) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    "Considered themselves...her patrons and superiors" (p. 86) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    \"A miscellaneous old gentleman\" (p. 100) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    "A miscellaneous old gentleman" (p. 100) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
    According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)

 

\"'You odd little chicken'\" (p. 148) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'You odd little chicken'" (p. 148) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'This has done me good'\" (p. 184) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'This has done me good'" (p. 184) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'I am your kinsman, my dear.'\" (p. 196)in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'I am your kinsman, my dear.'" (p. 196)in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"With a gentle pleasure gleaming over his face\" (p. 230) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"With a gentle pleasure gleaming over his face" (p. 230) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Faces looked upward to him there\" (p. 258) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"Faces looked upward to him there" (p. 258) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
Title page of volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
Title page of volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gablesillustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
List of illustrations in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)<p> Note following: The head-pieces and initials in this edition were designed by Edith and Mildred Cowles</p>
List of illustrations in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gablesillustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)

Note following: The head-pieces and initials in this edition were designed by Edith and Mildred Cowles


According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"In keeping with the dismal and bitter weather\" (from p. 165) <p>Frontispiece of volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)</p>
"In keeping with the dismal and bitter weather" (from p. 165)

Frontispiece of volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gablesillustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)


According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
Page 1 of \"The Arched Window,\" the first chapter of volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
Page 1 of "The Arched Window," the first chapter of volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Scattering airy spheres abroad\" (p. 22) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"Scattering airy spheres abroad" (p. 22) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"In the arbor of the Pyncheon garden\" (p. 40) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"In the arbor of the Pyncheon garden" (p. 40) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Like the flowers...beautiful and delicate\" (p. 58) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"Like the flowers...beautiful and delicate" (p. 58) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'Look me in the face'\" (p. 106) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"'Look me in the face'" (p. 106) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"In the dark tide of oblivion\" (p. 202) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"In the dark tide of oblivion" (p. 202) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"A mystery about the picture\" (p. 208) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"A mystery about the picture" (p. 208) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"He persisted in his melodious appeals\" (p. 232) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"He persisted in his melodious appeals" (p. 232) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'Tell me, tell me!'\" (p. 246) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"'Tell me, tell me!'" (p. 246) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Seemed to hear a strain of music\" (p. 276) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"Seemed to hear a strain of music" (p. 276) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
<I/>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
The House of the Seven Gables
The House of the Seven Gables with an Introduction by George Parsons Lathrop, Salem Edition, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, 1892. 
Book cover of Norton Critical Edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Book cover of Norton Critical Edition of The House of the Seven Gables 
From the collection of Hawthorne editions by Dr. John Idol, jr. now housed in the Peabody Essex Museum 
A 1913 edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> with cover art by Charles S. Olcott
A 1913 edition of The House of the Seven Gables with cover art by Charles S. Olcott 
An edition published by Houghton, Mifflin, Boston, 1913 to be sold at The House of the Seven Gables  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Book cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables </I> by Washington Square Press
Book cover of The House of the Seven Gables by Washington Square Press 
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. now housed in the Peabody Essex Museum (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Reproduction of the frontispiece by Maude Cowles for an 1899 edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> published by Houghton, Mifflin, Boston
Reproduction of the frontispiece by Maude Cowles for an 1899 edition of The House of the Seven Gables published by Houghton, Mifflin, Boston
Reproduction of the frontispiece by Maude Cowles for an 1899 edition of The House of the Seven Gables published by Houghton, Mifflin, Boston  (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
First page edition for Classics Illustrated version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>, #52
First page edition for Classics Illustrated version of The House of the Seven Gables, #52 
First page edition for Classics Illustrated version of The House of the Seven Gables, #52  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Book cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Book cover of The House of the Seven Gables 
From collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides at the Peabody Essex Museum (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Illustration of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> as rendered for Dell Comics, # 12-840-401. About 1963.
Illustration of The House of the Seven Gables as rendered for Dell Comics, # 12-840-401. About 1963. 
Illustration of The House of the Seven Gables as rendered for Dell Comics, # 12-840-401. About 1963.  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Book cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> illustrated by C. G. Bush
Book cover of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by C. G. Bush 
Book cover of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by C. G. Bush Dr. John Idol says, "One of a group of illustrations, unpublished as far as I know, held by The Essex Institute."  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Illustration by Valenti Angelo for Heritage Press edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>, 1935
Illustration by Valenti Angelo for Heritage Press edition of The House of the Seven Gables, 1935 
Dr. John L. Idol, Jr. explains in his lecture delivered at the Turner-Ingersoll House on September 14, 2000, "No doubt the most celebrated illustrator asked to prepare a set of pictures for The House of the Seven Gables was Italian-born, California-raised, Valenti Angelo,whose colored drawings appeared in the Heritage Club edition in 1935. His oval-shaped and colored illustrations stand at the head of each chapter, each illustration meant to convey the principal mood or event in the chapter it introduces. Here there is no minuteness of detail, nothing resembling Dutch painting at its most realistic. Rather almost ghost-like figures and indistinct structures bring out the gravity and melodrama of Hawthorne's blend of New England Gothicism and the emerging elements of realism in American fiction. One is inclined to say of these broad strokes and the melancholy feelings evoked is that they haunt the book. One is also inclined to say that Angelo wanted to project in his illustrations those qualities which Hawthorne associated with the romance as a distinct form of literature. Here are words that Angelo must have seized upon as he read the romance: If [the writer] think fit … he may so manage his atmospherical medium as to bring out or mellow the lights, and deepen and enrich the shadows, of the picture. (xv) Angelo's illustration, in their dark hues of reddish-brown and sage and their lighter hues of yellow and blue, never let us forget that we are reading another of Hawthorne's Americanized Gothic tales."  (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)

Illustration of a 1968 German edition of The House of the Seven Gables.Illustrator unknown.  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Spanish book cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Spanish book cover of The House of the Seven Gables
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Hungarian Book Cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Hungarian Book Cover of The House of the Seven Gables
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Portuguese book cover of <I> The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Portuguese book cover of The House of the Seven Gables 
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  
Copy of illustration for a French edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> for children
Copy of illustration for a French edition of The House of the Seven Gables for children
Copy of illustration for a French edition of The House of the Seven Gablesfor children Of the cover  
Book Cover of  <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> with Face on the House
Book Cover of The House of the Seven Gables with Face on the House
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  
Holgrave and Phoebe on book cover of Washington Square edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Holgrave and Phoebe on book cover of Washington Square edition of The House of the Seven Gables
This image of Holgrave and Phoebe depicts them as a romantic young couple. None of the problematic aspects of Holgrave’s experience are hinted at in this illustration. (from the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Book Cover of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> with Gargoyle
Book Cover of The House of the Seven Gables with Gargoyle 
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  
Book Cover of Bantam Classic version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Book Cover of Bantam Classic version of The House of the Seven Gables
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  
Book Cover of Dutch version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Book Cover of Dutch version of The House of the Seven Gables
From the collection of Dr. John L. Idol, jr. which now resides in the Peabody Essex Museum  
Book cover of Riverside Bookshelf version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>, 1924 edition illustrated by Helen Mason Grose
Book cover of Riverside Bookshelf version of The House of the Seven Gables, 1924 edition illustrated by Helen Mason Grose 
Dr. John L. Idol Jr., in a lecture at the Turner-Ingersoll House on September 14, 2000, discusses the illustrations by Helen Mason Grose for the Houghton Mifflin Riverside Bookshelf edition of the novel: "In minutely detailed paintings in color and in woodcuts done in black and white, she presented a prettified, sentimental, and energized set of illustrations. Her characters interact, especially in the paintings, and she showed a knack for choosing dramatic scenes where reader interest in most intense, for example, when Judge Pyncheon attempts to kiss Phoebe. Grose depicts her drawing back just as Judge leans towards her, his lips in full pucker. Hepzibah's consternation upon seeing Ned Higgins enter her cent-shop is vividly captured. Grose has been attentive enough to Hawthorne's text to render the house with an over- hanging second story. Her efforts as a collaborative artist won't likely draw applause from mature readers, since she seems to have supplied illustrations suitable for readers in Houghton Mifflin's Riverside Bookshelf Series." (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)

 

  • Picture of chicken yard from <I>House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Picture of chicken yard from House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Illustration by Helen Mason Grose of Phoebe in <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> from the 1924 edition published by Houghton Mifflin
    Illustration by Helen Mason Grose of Phoebe in The House of the Seven Gables from the 1924 edition published by Houghton Mifflin
    John Idol says, "To Helen Mason Grose goes the honor of having provided the greatest number of full-page illustrations for the romance in an edition appearing in 1924.... As of 1952 this edition had gone through 19 printings, serving readers from the Roaring 'Twenties up to the Baby Boomers. In minutely detailed paintings in color and in woodcuts done in black and white, she presented a prettified, sentimental, and energized set of illustrations. Her characters interact, especially in the paintings, and she showed a knack for choosing dramatic scenes where reader interest in most intense...." (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
    Book cover of Oxford Pocket Classics edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Book cover of Oxford Pocket Classics edition of The House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Hepzibah, Phoebe, and Judge Pyncheon depicted on cover of 1977 illustrated edition by Now Age/Pendulum Press of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Hepzibah, Phoebe, and Judge Pyncheon depicted on cover of 1977 illustrated edition by Now Age/Pendulum Press of The House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Pendulum Press)
    Book cover of Watermill Classic edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> 1983?
    Book cover of Watermill Classic edition of The House of the Seven Gables 1983?
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Book cover of The House of the Seven Gables 
    Book cover of Pocket Version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> featuring Holgrave and Phoebe
    Book cover of Pocket Version of The House of the Seven Gablesfeaturing Holgrave and Phoebe 
    Holgrave and Phoebe appear as a romantic, almost melodramatic young couple. The cover emphasizes their love story as the dominant feature of Hawthorne’s novel.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Book cover of Everyman paperback edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
featuring Holgrave and Phoebe
    Book cover of Everyman paperback edition of The House of the Seven Gables featuring Holgrave and Phoebe 
    For the Everyman edition of The House of the Seven Gables, the illustrator created more stylized images of Holgrave and Phoebe, creating a stronger feeling of distance between them. (from the collection of John L. Idol, Jr. now housed at the Peabody Essex Museum)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Gothic book cover of The House of the Seven Gables 

    Book cover of ALS (Amsco Literature Series) version of The House of the Seven Gables 

    Book cover of 1981 Bantam Classic version of The House of the Seven Gables 
    Book cover of World's Classic edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> with reproduction of  Van Zandt's painting of a well-dressed gentleman riding a sleigh
    Book cover of World's Classic edition of The House of the Seven Gables with reproduction of Van Zandt's painting of a well-dressed gentleman riding a sleigh
     (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
    Last page of Classics Illustrated edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Last page of Classics Illustrated edition of The House of the Seven Gables
    In the Classic Comics version of The House of the Seven Gables, Holgrave is transformed into Jonathan Maule, whose goal is to break the curse of the Seven Gables. In this illustration, Holgrave appears older than his twenty-two years might suggest.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Last panel of Classics Illustrated edition of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Last panel of Classics Illustrated edition of The House of the Seven Gables 
    In his lecture on September 14, 2000, Dr. John L. Idol, Jr. discusses the comic-book versions of Hawthorne: "I come now to a form of illustrated books that students for decades have been tempted to turn into ponies--and many of them may have succeeded. I'm speaking, of course, of the comic-book-like illustrated classics, those publications that give us realistically drawn characters and places with a bare-bone version of the story. In the earliest manifestation of presenting the romance in the form of serial drawings, the concluding scene became more Poeish than Hawthornean, for we see the seven-gabled house going down in flames not exactly a reprise of the ending of 'The Fall of the House of Usher' but in the same spirit."  (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
    Holgrave from <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Holgrave from The House of the Seven Gables
    This illustration from The House of the Seven Gables places Phoebe and Holgrave together in the chicken yard. It emphasizes a pastoral quality in their setting, one that foreshadows their retreat to the country estate at the end of the novel, but that ignores the darkness of Seven Gables.  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Holgrave and Phoebe on Pocket Version of <I><The House of the Seven Gables </I>
    Holgrave and Phoebe on Pocket Version of 
    Holgrave and Phoebe appear as a romantic, almost melodramatic young couple. The cover emphasizes their love story as the dominant feature of Hawthorne's novel.  (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)

     
  • The Turner-Ingersoll House
    The Turner-Ingersoll House, 54 Turner St., Salem, aka \"The House of the Seven Gables\"
    The Turner-Ingersoll House, 54 Turner St., Salem, aka "The House of the Seven Gables"
    Photograph of the House of the Seven Gables with tulips in bloom. (photography by Dan Popp)
    Postcard (1905) of the Turner-Ingersoll House aka \"The House of the Seven Gables\"--with only three gables
    Postcard (1905) of the Turner-Ingersoll House aka "The House of the Seven Gables"--with only three gables
    When Caroline Emmerton purchased the house at 54 Turner St., it had lost all but three of its gables. In his lecture on September 14, 2000, Dr. John L. Idol, Jr. noted that Caroline Emmerton "sat about restoring the house, engaging an architect, Joseph Edward Chandler, to help her. He was familiar with Colonial architecture and led her to the discovery of the position of three of the missing gables. They were replaced. Unhappily, for them, as things turned out, they went ahead with the construction of a seventh gable, since, by tradition, the house had sported a seventh one. Further study of the building revealed the presence of another original gable, the authentic seventh.... Despite the evidence before her that Hawthorne's knowledge of the old house was superficial at best, Emmerton pushed ahead with her efforts to transform it into the house that Hawthorne had moved from Turner Street into the pages of his romance. She remodeled the house to give it the requisite number of gables, choosing to keep the one at back rather than to build an authentic seventh over the front entrance, setting up a cent-shop, and furnishing the house in such a manner as to be able to say that a certain room was Phoebe's, that a particular window was the one Clifford had stood at as he gazed upon the street below. As far as possible, life was following art, although she was puzzled to find that Hawthorne had made no apparent use of the secret passage way that the Turner-Ingersoll house has."  (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
    Kitchen fireplace
    Kitchen fireplace
    Fireplace in kitchen in House of Seven Gables. Hepzibah and Phoebe would have prepared meals using such a fireplace. (courtesy of The House of the Seven Gables Historic Site)
    Postcard of The House of the Seven Gables c. 1905
    Postcard of The House of the Seven Gables c. 1905
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Postcard (1905) of The House of the Seven Gables
    Postcard (1905) of The House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Postcard c. 1900 of The House of the Seven Gables
    Postcard c. 1900 of The House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Postcard c. 1900; Garden View of The House of the Seven Gables
    Postcard c. 1900; Garden View of The House of the Seven Gables
     
    Postcard c. 1900 of the Parlor in the House of the Seven Gables
    Postcard c. 1900 of the Parlor in the House of the Seven Gables
     (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Postcard of the House of the Seven Gables 

     
  • Philip English House
    Drawing of the Philip English House in Salem
    Drawing of the Philip English House in Salem
    Built in 1683 at the head of what is now English St., not far from Collins Cove, this house of many gables was thought by some to be the location of the one described in Hawthorne's novel, The House of the Seven Gables. Called "The Great House," it was considered the most lavish home in Salem of that time. Philip and his wife, Mary, lived here in 1692 when they were accused of witchcraft. Initially imprisoned in the Cart and Wheel Inn in Salem, they were moved to Boston in June and placed under house arrest after the intervention of friends. Allowed their freedom during the day in Boston because of their upper-class status, they fled on a ship to New York in August before their trial in Salem. A secret garret room that was discovered when the house was razed may have been built after Philip and Mary returned to Salem as a hiding place should it ever be needed. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

     
  • Thomas Maule:
    Thomas Maule House
    Thomas Maule House
    Thomas Maule House. From Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. II. 

     
  • Film version
    Publicity photo from Universal Picture's film version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
    Publicity photo from Universal Picture's film version of The House of the Seven Gables
    A film version of The House of the Seven Gableswas made in 1940 starring Vincent Price. Directed by Joe May, the film also starred George Sanders,Gilbert Emery, Dick Foran, Nan Grey, Cecil Kellaway, Margaret Lindsay, Miles Mander, Alan Napier, and Charles Trowbridge. Other credits are as follows: Composer, Frank Skinner; Costume Designer, Vera West; Director of Photography, Milton Krasner; Editor, Frank Gross Producer,Burt Kelly;Production Designers, Jack Otterson and Richard H. Riedel;Screenwriters Lester Cole and Harold Greene.  (copyright Turner Classic Movies; used with permission)
    Publicity photo from film version of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> starring Vincent Price and Margaret Lindsay
    Publicity photo from film version of The House of the Seven Gablesstarring Vincent Price and Margaret Lindsay
    A film version of The House of the Seven Gables was made in 1940 starring Vincent Price. Directed by Joe May, the film also starred George Sanders,Gilbert Emery, Dick Foran, Nan Grey, Cecil Kellaway, Margaret Lindsay, Miles Mander, Alan Napier, and Charles Trowbridge. Other credits are as follows: Composer, Frank Skinner; Costume Designer, Vera West; Director of Photography, Milton Krasner; Editor, Frank Gross Producer,Burt Kelly;Production Designers, Jack Otterson and Richard H. Riedel;Screenwriters Lester Cole and Harold Greene.  (copyright Turner Classic Movies; used with permission)

The Blithedale Romance

  • Book Covers and Illustrations
    \"Say What You Wish, and Leave Me\" Frontispiece by T.Eyre Macklin
    "Say What You Wish, and Leave Me" Frontispiece by T.Eyre Macklin
    from scene on p. 252 of Blithedale Romance published in 1852 in London by Walter Scott Limited (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
    Title page of 1852 edition of <i>Blithedale Romance</i> published in London by Walter Scott Limited
    Title page of 1852 edition of Blithedale Romance published in London by Walter Scott Limited
     (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)

    Cover of The Blithedale Romance with introduction by Arlin Turner 

    Cover of Signet Classic edition of The Blithedale Romance with introduction by Alfred Kazin 

    Cover of W.W. Norton edition of The Blithedale Romance edited by Seymour Gross and Rosalie Murphy 

    Cover of the Laurel edition of The Blithedale Romance with an introduction by David Levin 

    Cover of paperback edition of The Blithedale Romance with introduction by Annette Kolodny 

    ADD! 

    ADD! 

    ADD! 

    Cover of Bantam Classic edition of The Blithedale Romance 
    Zenobia, illustration from the<I> Essex Institute Historical Collection</I> volume entitled \"From Cover to Cover: The Presentation of Hawthorne's Major Romances\"
    Zenobia, illustration from the Essex Institute Historical Collectionvolume entitled "From Cover to Cover: The Presentation of Hawthorne's Major Romances" 
    This image accompanies an article by Dr. Melinda Ponder entitled "The Blithedale Romance." The image is reproduced from the frontispiece of an edition of The Blithedale Romance published in Philadelphia by Henry Altemus c. 1900. The caption in the EIHC article reads, "Zenobia portrayed as a fashionable beauty, ca. 1900"(62).  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

The Marble Faun


Fig 13. Illustrated title page. From "The Marble Faun" (Cambridge, Mass: Riverside Press, 1883). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Fig 14. Miriam and Donatello. From "The Marble Faun" (Cambridge, Mass: Riverside Press, 1883), frontispiece. 

Fig. 15 The Faun of Praxiteles. Photogravure illustration. From "The Marble Faun" (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co, 1890, oppisite p.22 

Fig. 16 Hilda's tower. Photogravure illustration. From "The Marble Faun" (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co. 1890, opposite p. 68 

Criticism Related to Hawthorne's Novels

Title page of 1878 edition of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
Title page of 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter (courtesy of James R. Osgood and Co.)
 
  • Fanshaw
  • The Scarlet Letter
  • The House of the Seven Gables
  • The Blithedale Romance
  • The Marble Faun
  • Unfinished Novels


 

The Scarlet Letter

In The Threads of the Scarlet Letter: A Study of Hawthorne's Transformative Art, Richard Kopley suggests that the scene in The Scarlet Letter in which Chillingworth approaches the sleeping minister may have been inspired by Edgar Allan Poe’s story, “The Tell-Tale Heart.”(courtesy of University of Delaware Press)