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Hawthorne at Salem

Life & Times

Short Stories and Sketches

Welcome to the Short Stories and Sketches Section

Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from <I>Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,</i> frontispiece
Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,frontispiece (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
 
Hawthorne is probably best known for the novel, The Scarlet Letter, but many readers also know him for his short stories and sketches, a number of which are featured in literary anthologies. These anthologies seem to publish the same few stories, however: "Young Goodman Brown," "The Minister's Black Veil," "Rappaccini's Daughter," "The Birth-mark," "The Artist of the Beautiful," "My Kinsman, Major Molineaux," "The Custom House Sketch,"and, less often, "The May-pole of Merry Mount," "Roger Malvin's Burial," and "Ethan Brand." Hawthorne wrote over 100 short stories and sketches, however. Sixteen of these are uncollected stories; the rest are in three collections: Twice-told TalesMosses from an Old Manse, and The Snow Image and Other Twice-told Tales. This website includes information on some of Hawthorne's lesser known stories as well as on those that are frequently anthologized.

Literature Related to Hawthorne's Short Stories

Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from <I>Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,</i> frontispiece
Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,frontispiece (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
 

Short Stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne

  • Twice Told Tales(1837, 1851)
  • Mosses from an Old Manse(1846, 1854)
  • The Snow Image(1852)
  • Tanglewood Tales(1853)
  • The Story Teller(unpublished 1834?)(manuscript lost, but possible order reconstructed by Weber [Webe89 183-5 ]:) (see www.eldritchpress.org)
  • Uncollected stories or sketches in magazines(1830-1844)

Note: The complete text is linked to the title of each short story. Commentary within our website is linked to words after the title.

Twice Told Tales(1837, 1851)

Mosses from an Old Manse(1846, 1854)

The Snow Image(1852)

Tanglewood Tales(1853)

The Story Teller(unpublished 1834?)

(manuscript lost, but possible order reconstructed by Weber [Webe89 183-5 ]:)

Uncollected stories or sketches in magazines (1830-1844)

Original Documents Related to Short Stories and Sketches

  • Short Story Volumes
    • Twice-Told Tales
      <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>,
      Twice-Told Tales,
      The Cover of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>, the \"Salem Edition,\" 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
      Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
      Title Page of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      The Custom House, Salem
      The Custom House, Salem
      From Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    • Mosses from an Old Manse
      Cover of Hawthorne's <I/>Mosses From An Old Manse</I>
      Cover of Hawthorne's Mosses From An Old Manse
      "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      <I>Mosses From an Old Manse</I>
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      This elaborately illustrated title page graces the 1893 or 1894 Henry Altemus edition of Mosses From an Old Manse
      The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from <I>Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2</I>
      The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2 
      from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
  • Short Stories and Sketches
    • Alice Doane’s Appeal
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Samuel Parris Autograph
      Samuel Parris Autograph
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      John Proctor Autograph
      John Proctor Autograph
      The autograph of John Proctor, executed for witchcraft August 19, 1692.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's  <I>The Wonders of the Invisible World </I>
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's The Wonders of the Invisible World 
      Cotton Mather's defense of the Salem Witchcraft Trials portrayed those involved as caught in a battle between the forces of good and evil in the New World.  
      <I/>A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft,</I> 1697, by John Hale.
      A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697, by John Hale.
      Title Page of Rev. John Hale's brief history of the Salem Witchcraft trials, A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697. Hale was the Pastor of the Church in Beverly, Massachusetts until 1700 and an ardent supporter of the witch hunts of 1692. His opinion changed, however, when his second wife, Sarah (Noyes), was accused.  (courtesy of The Beverly Historical Society)
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Sermon, \"Humiliations followed by Deliverences,\" published in 1697. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Sermon, "Humiliations followed by Deliverences," published in 1697. ©The Huntington Library
      In this sermon, Mather gives the first account of Hannah Duston's captivity and escape from the Abenaki Indians. Mather interviewed Duston after her return to Haverhill, Massachusetts. A revised version later appeared in his Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702. (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      Title Page, <I/>The Whole Booke of Psalms,</I>
Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, The Whole Booke of Psalms, Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      The "Bay Psalm Book," the name generally given to The Whole Booke of Psalms, was the authorized hymnal of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first book printed in the English colonies. John Cotton wrote the Preface and Richard Mather, John Eliot, and Thomas Weld did the translation.  (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      Title Page of \"The World Bewitch'd\" (London, 1695)by Balthazar Bekker, D.D. and Pastor at Amsterdam
      Title Page of "The World Bewitch'd" (London, 1695)by Balthazar Bekker, D.D. and Pastor at Amsterdam
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Charles Upham's <I/>Salem Witchcraft<I>
      Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft
      Title Page from Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Duston Family
      Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
      Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
      Map of Hannah Duston's escape journey on the Merrimack River, from Contoocook Island in Penacook, NH to Haverhill, MA.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
    • Feathertop
      Witches of Warboyse
      Witches of Warboyse
      Frontispiece to"A Complete History of Magick, Sorcery, and Witchcraft...." (London, 1715)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      This portrait of Old Mother Rigby from "Feathertop" serves as the frontispiece for the 1893 or 1894 edition of the Henry Altemus publication of Mosses From an Old Manse.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Gentle Boy
      \"The Gentle Boy\"
      "The Gentle Boy"
      Cover of "The Gentle Boy" published in a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London in 1839 and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of \"The Gentle Boy\"
      Title Page of "The Gentle Boy"
      "The Gentle Boy" was published in a separate volume in 1839 by Weeks, Jordan & Co. in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Gentle Boy
      The Gentle Boy
      Dedication page of "The Gentle Boy" published in 1839 as a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Illustration by Sophia Peabody from <I>The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale</I>, 1839
      Illustration by Sophia Peabody from The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale, 1839
      This illustration of Ibrahim by Hawthorne's wife captures Ibrahim's vulnerability and gentleness. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
      The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
      Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      The First Quaker Meeting House
From  chapter XV entitled \"Quaker Persecution\" Sidney Perley's <I>The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. II, 1926</I>
      The First Quaker Meeting House From chapter XV entitled "Quaker Persecution" Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. II, 1926
      Drawing (pencil sketch)by James Henry Emerton, 1861 (as meeting house stood in Gallows Hill pasture as a woodshed)  (special thanks to Salem Public Library.)
    • Main Street
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      Full view of The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686 
      Indian Names on the Salem Deed, 1686
      Indian Names on the Salem Deed, 1686
      Detail of the Indian Deed to Salem, 1686. The marks of Sam Wuttaanoh, John Tontohqunne and Cicely Petaghuncksq are shown.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      Back side of The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686 
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      Detail of an early document showing the bow and arrow that was the Squaw Sachem's Mark. The words identifying the "signature" were written by a clerk.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents 
      Indian Signatures from Sidney Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

      This is William Wood's map, taken from his book, New England's Prospect,which includes one of the earliest descriptive accounts of Salem, Massachusetts, the local Indians, and the natural environment.  
      Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts 
      Map of Essex County, Massachusetts from Sidney Perley's Indian Deeds of Essex County, 1912, showing Indian place names and tribal areas.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Map of Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts 
      Map of Essex County, Massachusetts from Sidney Perley's Indian Deeds of Essex County  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The First \"Main Street\":  Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Naumkeag
      The First "Main Street": Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Naumkeag
      This map illustrates the site of the first English settlement in Naumkeag. Here Roger Conant came with his companions in the autumn of 1626.  
      Map of New England in 1640
      Map of New England in 1640 
      This map of New England in 1640 shows the region's major towns and settlements.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Essex County, Massachusetts in 1643.
      Essex County, Massachusetts in 1643.
      This map illustrates the first towns or "plantations" in northeastern Massachusetts.  
      Relief Map of Salem
      Relief Map of Salem
      Relief map of Salem from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      \"The Ancient Ways\" of Essex County
      "The Ancient Ways" of Essex County
      The old roads of the Salem area from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Endecott Lands, Danvers (Salem Village)
      Endecott Lands, Danvers (Salem Village) 
      John Endecott Lands in Danversport Area (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Indian Village (From Hariot's \"Relation\")
      Indian Village (From Hariot's "Relation")
      Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      Roger Conant Autograph
      Roger Conant Autograph
      The Autograph of Roger Conant (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Minister’s Black Veil
      Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
      Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
      Print of Adam and Eve as Their Disobedience to God in the Garden of Eden Brings Sin and Death into the World, the Original Sin Precipitating the Fall of All Humanity (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
      Genesis, Chapter 3, Verses 17,18, and 19 from Derby Family Bible
      Genesis, Chapter 3, Verses 17,18, and 19 from Derby Family Bible
      The scriptural passage serves as a source for the Calvinistic Doctrine of Original Sin whereby all descendants of the Original Sinners, in other words all humanity sprung from Adam and Eve, are presumed to share the defect of the parents, the inherent tendency to go against God and serve sin. The Doctrine serves as the premise for people's need to seek salvation from their evil nature by confessing their state and seeking salvation through rebirth in the Savior, Jesus Christ.  (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
    • The Seven Vagabonds
      Map of New England in 1640
      Map of New England in 1640 
      This map of New England in 1640 shows the region's major towns and settlements.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600. 
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents 
      Indian Signatures from Sidney Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      Detail of an early document showing the bow and arrow that was the Squaw Sachem's Mark. The words identifying the "signature" were written by a clerk.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • Young Goodman Brown
      The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar
      The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar 
      Illustration from Chap-Book of the 18th Century by John Ashton (L.Chatto and Windus,1882). Witches were thought to own or associate with strange animals and evil creatures called "familiars." These are described in many of the original documents of the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's  <I>The Wonders of the Invisible World </I>
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's The Wonders of the Invisible World 
      Cotton Mather's defense of the Salem Witchcraft Trials portrayed those involved as caught in a battle between the forces of good and evil in the New World.  
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's <I/>Magnalia Christi Americana</I>, 1702.  London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702.
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702. London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702. 
      "The Great Works of Christ in America"—Mather's history of colonial Massachussetts is a major work of early New England history through the Puritan imagination. In the General Introduction Mather states: "I WRITE the WONDERS of the CHRISTIAN RELIGION, flying from the depravations of Europe, to the American Strand; and, assisted by the Holy Author of that Religion, I do with all conscience of Truth, required therein by Him, who is the Truth itself, report the wonderful displays of His infinite Power, Wisdom, Goodness, and Faithfulness, wherewith His Divine Providenee hath irradiated an Indian Wilderness."  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      Title Page, <I/>The Whole Booke of Psalms,</I>
Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, The Whole Booke of Psalms, Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      The "Bay Psalm Book," the name generally given to The Whole Booke of Psalms, was the authorized hymnal of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first book printed in the English colonies. John Cotton wrote the Preface and Richard Mather, John Eliot, and Thomas Weld did the translation.  (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      <I/>A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft,</I> 1697, by John Hale.
      A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697, by John Hale.
      Title Page of Rev. John Hale's brief history of the Salem Witchcraft trials, A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697. Hale was the Pastor of the Church in Beverly, Massachusetts until 1700 and an ardent supporter of the witch hunts of 1692. His opinion changed, however, when his second wife, Sarah (Noyes), was accused.  (courtesy of The Beverly Historical Society)
      Charles Upham's <I/>Salem Witchcraft<I>
      Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft
      Title Page from Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator, Peabody Essex Museum Photo (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
      Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
      In the British Islands, it was believed that the Devil gave his witches a faithful demonic creature, often in the shape of a small animal (a black cat, dog, or toad, for example) that would advise the witch and assist in her evil doings. Also known as "imps" or "familiar spirits," these malicious creatures were different from the Devil himself, who often took the shape of a beast or a human, in European and early American traditions of witchcraft. It was thought that the witch's familiar would suck her blood for nourishment.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley 
      Map from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. 2, (1924). The map shows the "Salem Farms" area that is known as the Town of Danvers today. It was here that the witchcraft hysteria of 1692 actually began.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village in 1692 by W.P. Upham, 1866.
      Map of Salem Village in 1692 by W.P. Upham, 1866.
      From Charles W. Upham’s Salem Witchcraft (1867)  (courtesy of the University of Virginia.)
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley 
      Map from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. 2, (1924). The map shows the "Salem Farms" area that is known as the Town of Danvers today. It was here that the witchcraft hysteria of 1692 actually began.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Samuel Parris Autograph
      Samuel Parris Autograph
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Document from Salem Witch Trials signed by John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin
      Document from Salem Witch Trials signed by John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin
       (courtesy of The House of the Seven Gables Historic Site)

Images Related to the Short Stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Covers and Illustrations

 

  • Grandfather’s Chair
    Cover of <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    Cover of Grandfather's Chair
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Cover of <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    Cover of Grandfather's Chair
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Cover of <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    Cover of Grandfather's Chair
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    Cover of <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    Cover of Grandfather's Chair
     (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    \"How to Capture the British Army\" from <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    "How to Capture the British Army" from Grandfather's Chair
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill from Grandfather's Chair, Riverside Press edition, 1900, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    \"A Judgment Seat\" from <i>Grandfather's Chair</i>
    "A Judgment Seat" from Grandfather's Chair
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill from Grandfather's Chair, Riverside Edition, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1900. (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
    George Fox, Quaker from England
    George Fox, Quaker from England
    George Fox launched the Quaker movement in England in 1646; he sailed to American in 1671. Hawthorne depicts Fox in a favorable light in Grandfather's Chair, "Grimshawe," and "A Virtuoso's Collection." In "The Gentle Boy," however, Hawthorne points to the fanaticism of the Quakers. (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
  • A Wonder-Book
    Cover of Hawthorne's <I>A Wonder Book</I>
    Cover of Hawthorne's A Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    Title page of Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    Title page of Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928 (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    Preface to Hawthorne's <I>A Wonder Book</I>
    Preface to Hawthorne's A Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928 (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    Page one of Table of Contents from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    Page one of Table of Contents from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928 (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    Page two of Table of Contents of Hawthorne's <I>A Wonder Book</I>
    Page two of Table of Contents of Hawthorne's A Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928 (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    <I>A Wonder Book</I>
    A Wonder Book
    Page one of list of Illustrations from Hawthorne's Wonder Book illustrated by Arthur Rackham, published by Doubleday,Doran,& Co. (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    <i>A Wonder- Book for Girls and Boys</i> illustrated by Arthur Rackham
    A Wonder- Book for Girls and Boys illustrated by Arthur Rackham
    Page two of list of Illustrations from Hawthorne's A Wonder- Book for Girls and Boys illustrated by Arthur Rackham (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Every flower changed to gold\" from the frontispiece of Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Every flower changed to gold" from the frontispiece of Hawthorne's Wonder Book 
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Danae clasped her child closely\" from \"The Gorgon's Head\" in Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Danae clasped her child closely" from "The Gorgon's Head" in Hawthorne's Wonder Book 
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"As Perseus walked along the people pointed after him\" from \"The Gorgon's Head\" in Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "As Perseus walked along the people pointed after him" from "The Gorgon's Head" in Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"It struck Midas as rather inconvenient\" from \"The Golden Touch\" in Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "It struck Midas as rather inconvenient" from "The Golden Touch" in Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Little Marygold was a golden statue!\" from \"The Golden Touch\" in Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Little Marygold was a golden statue!" from "The Golden Touch" in Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"There was no danger nor trouble of any kind\" from \"The Paradise of Children\" in Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "There was no danger nor trouble of any kind" from "The Paradise of Children" in Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Oh what a good time was that to be alive in\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Oh what a good time was that to be alive in" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"A sudden swarm of winged creatures brushed past her\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "A sudden swarm of winged creatures brushed past her" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Twining wreaths of flowers\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Twining wreaths of flowers" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"They have sea-green hair\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "They have sea-green hair" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"The Old Man of the Sea\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "The Old Man of the Sea" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Hercules gave a great shrug of his shoulder\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Hercules gave a great shrug of his shoulder" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"A scaly set of rascals\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "A scaly set of rascals" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"'I'm old Philemon,' murmured the oak\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "'I'm old Philemon,' murmured the oak" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
    \"Its three heads spluttering fire\" from Hawthorne's <I>Wonder Book</I>
    "Its three heads spluttering fire" from Hawthorne's Wonder Book
    Illustrated by Arthur Rackham,published by Doubleday, Doran, & Company, Inc. in 1928  (courtesy of Anne Tullson)
  • A Wonder-Book and Grandfather's Chair
    Illustration from frontispiece of <I>A Wonder-Book</I>; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    Illustration from frontispiece of A Wonder-Book; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, A Wonder-Book and Grandfather's Chair, two volumes in one 
    Illustration from frontispiece to <I>A Grandfather's Chair</I> published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    Illustration from frontispiece to A Grandfather's Chair published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, A Wonder-Book and Grandfather's Chair, two volumes in one 

  • A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Cover of <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>
    Cover of Hawthorne's Wonder-Book
    Houghton Mifflin, Riverside Series (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Title Page of <I>A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys</I>, from the Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Title Page of A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys, from the Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin 
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Perseus Showing the Gorgon's Head from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Perseus Showing the Gorgon's Head from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Stranger Appearing to Midas from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    The Stranger Appearing to Midas from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Pandora Opens the Box from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Pandora Opens the Box from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Hercules and the Old Man of the Sea from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Hercules and the Old Man of the Sea from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Strangers Entertained from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    The Strangers Entertained from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Bellerophon on Pegasus from <I>Hawthorne's Wonder-Book</I>, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
    Bellerophon on Pegasus from Hawthorne's Wonder-Book, Riverside Literature Series, Houghton Mifflin
     (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
  • A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    <I>A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls</I>
Cover of the Book, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls Cover of the Book, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Frontispiece, <I>A Wonder- Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    Frontispiece, A Wonder- Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin 
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Title Page of  <I>A Wonder- Book for Girls and Boys</I> [reverse order from cover which is <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>], 35th edition,Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    Title Page of A Wonder- Book for Girls and Boys [reverse order from cover which is A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls], 35th edition,Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Gorgon's Head from <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    The Gorgon's Head from A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Golden Touch from <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    The Golden Touch from A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Paradise of Children <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    The Paradise of Children A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Golden Apples from <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    The Golden Apples from A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Miraculous Pitcher from <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    The Miraculous Pitcher from A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    Belleraphon and the Chimera from <I>A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls</I>, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    Belleraphon and the Chimera from A Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls, 35th edition, Riverside Press, Houghton Mifflin
    engravings by Baker from designs by Billings (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
  • The Gentle Boy illustrated by Sophia Peabody
    \"The Gentle Boy\"
    "The Gentle Boy"
    Cover of "The Gentle Boy" published in a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London in 1839 and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Title Page of \"The Gentle Boy\"
    Title Page of "The Gentle Boy"
    "The Gentle Boy" was published in a separate volume in 1839 by Weeks, Jordan & Co. in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    The Gentle Boy
    The Gentle Boy
    Dedication page of "The Gentle Boy" published in 1839 as a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Illustration by Sophia Peabody from <I>The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale</I>, 1839
    Illustration by Sophia Peabody from The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale, 1839
    This illustration of Ibrahim by Hawthorne's wife captures Ibrahim's vulnerability and gentleness. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
  • Colonial Stories
    <I>Colonial Stories</I>
    Colonial Stories
    Cover of Colonial Stories illustrated by Frank T. Merrill and published in 1896 by Joseph Knight Company in Boston 
    Illustration from \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration from "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" 
    from Colonial Stories illustrated by Frank T. Merrill and published in 1896 by Joseph Knight Company in Boston (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill in "Howe's Masquerade" from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (x) 
    \"The Balcony\"
    "The Balcony"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill in "Howe's Masquerade" in In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (7) 
    \"Ye Beauteous Lady Eleanore cometh to Boston\"
    "Ye Beauteous Lady Eleanore cometh to Boston"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill in "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (57) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    \"She Snatched Away the Sable Curtain\"
    "She Snatched Away the Sable Curtain"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill in "Edward Randolph's Portrait" from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (45) 
    \"Edward Randolph's Portrait\"
    "Edward Randolph's Portrait" 
    Title page illustration by Frank T. Merrill from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (29) 
    Frontispiece illustration \"Several Personages descending toward the Door\" by Frank T. Merrill
    Frontispiece illustration "Several Personages descending toward the Door" by Frank T. Merrill 
    In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Photogravure illustration "He recoiled Several Steps from the Fiture" by Frank T. Merrill from "Howe's Masquerade" for In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906(facing 24) 
    Illustration \"A Pale Young Man...prostrated himself beside the Coach\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration "A Pale Young Man...prostrated himself beside the Coach" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" 
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906(facing 59) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

    Photogravure "Receive My Trust" by Frank T. Merrill in "Old Esther Dudley" from In Colonial Daysin the edition L.C. Page & Co. in 1906(facing 100) 
  • In Colonial Days
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill of Shem Drowne’s Indian warrior weathervane that stood on top of the Province House in Boston
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill of Shem Drowne’s Indian warrior weathervane that stood on top of the Province House in Boston 
    Shem Drowne was a renowned weather vane-maker of the mid 1700s. The illustration was for "Howe's Masquerade" in In Colonial Days published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (2) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    \"Some of these fables are really awful\"
    "Some of these fables are really awful"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Edward Randolph's Portrait" from In Colonial Days published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (opposite 38) 
    \"The Chairman of the Selectmen was adressing to the Lieutenant-Governor a Long and Solemn Protest\"
    "The Chairman of the Selectmen was adressing to the Lieutenant-Governor a Long and Solemn Protest"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Edward Randolph's Portrait" from In Colonial Dayspublished by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (opposite 42)  
    \"That Night a Processsion passed by Torchlight\"
    "That Night a Processsion passed by Torchlight"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (opposite 80) (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
    \"Old Esther Dudley\"
    "Old Esther Dudley"
    Title page drawing by Frank T. Merrill from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (83) 
    \"Heaven's Cause and the King's are One\"
    "Heaven's Cause and the King's are One"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Old Esther Dudley" from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (89)  
    \"Take This Key and keep it safe\"
    "Take This Key and keep it safe"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Old Esther Dudley" from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (92) 
    \"A Few of the Stanch, though Crestfallen Old Tories\"
    "A Few of the Stanch, though Crestfallen Old Tories"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Old Esther Dudley" from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (95) 
    \"The King of England's Birthday\"
    "The King of England's Birthday"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Old Esther Dudley" from In Colonial Days,published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (99) 
    \"Young Man, what is your Purpose?\"
    "Young Man, what is your Purpose?"
    Illustration by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (77) 
    Illustration \"The Communication could be of no Agreeable Import\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration "The Communication could be of no Agreeable Import" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle"
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (73) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Illustration \"Keep my Image in your Remembrance\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore’s Mantle\"
    Illustration "Keep my Image in your Remembrance" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" 
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (71) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Illustration \"I Pray you take one Sip of This Holy Wine\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration "I Pray you take one Sip of This Holy Wine" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" 
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (67) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Illustration \"A Gathering of Rank, Wealth, and Beauty\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration "A Gathering of Rank, Wealth, and Beauty" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" 
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (63) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    Illustration \"Governor Shute descended the Flight of Steps\" by Frank T. Merrill for \"Lady Eleanore's Mantle\"
    Illustration "Governor Shute descended the Flight of Steps" by Frank T. Merrill for "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" 
    from In Colonial Days, in the edition published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (60) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
  • Tanglewood Tales and Biographical Stories
    Illustration from frontispiece of <I>Tanglewood Tales</I>; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    Illustration from frontispiece of Tanglewood Tales; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, a two volume edition entitled Tanglewood Tales and Biographical Stories 
    Illustration from p. 2 of <I>Biographical Stories</I>; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    Illustration from p. 2 of Biographical Stories; published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, Tanglewood Tales and Biographical Stories, two volumes in one 
  • The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image [novel and short stories in one edition]
    Illustration depicting Clifford blowing soap-bubbles (cf. chapter XI \"The Arched Window\") from frontispiece to <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    Illustration depicting Clifford blowing soap-bubbles (cf. chapter XI "The Arched Window") from frontispiece to The House of the Seven Gables published in 1880 by Houghton, Osgood and Co., The Riverside Press, Cambridge
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image, two volumes in one  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    Illustration of the \"ancient and primitive wood\" from \"Main Street\" from frontispiece to <I>The Snow Image</I> published in 1880 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    Illustration of the "ancient and primitive wood" from "Main Street" from frontispiece to The Snow Image published in 1880 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image, two volumes in one  
  • Twice-Told Tales
    Illustration from \"The Gentle Boy\" depicting the Puritan approaching Ilbrahim, from frontispiece to <I>Twice-Told Tales</I>, volume one, published in 1881 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    Illustration from "The Gentle Boy" depicting the Puritan approaching Ilbrahim, from frontispiece to Twice-Told Tales, volume one, published in 1881 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, Twice-Told Tales,two volumes in one  
    Illustration of \"Footprints on the Sea Shore\" (cf. \"....we sat down upon almost the only stone that breaks the surface of the sand, and were lost in an unlooked-for and overpowering conception of the majesty and awfulness of the great deep,\" from frontispiece to <I>Twice-Told Tales</i>, volume two, published in 1881 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    Illustration of "Footprints on the Sea Shore" (cf. "....we sat down upon almost the only stone that breaks the surface of the sand, and were lost in an unlooked-for and overpowering conception of the majesty and awfulness of the great deep," from frontispiece to Twice-Told Tales, volume two, published in 1881 by Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston
    from the Illustrated Library Edition, Twice-Told Tales,two volumes in one  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
  • Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales
    Illustration for \"Lady Eleanore’s Mantle\" from <I>Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,</i> frontispiece
    Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales, frontispiece
    from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    Illustration for \"The Maypole of Merry Mount\",opposite page 70 from <I>Hawthorne's Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales</I>
    Illustration for "The Maypole of Merry Mount",opposite page 70 from Hawthorne's Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales
    from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from <I>Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2</I>
    The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2 
    from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    Illustration for \"Feathertop: A Moralized Legend,\" opposite p. 253, from <I>Hawthorne's Works,</I> vol. 2
    Illustration for "Feathertop: A Moralized Legend," opposite p. 253, from Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2 
    from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
  • The House of the Seven Gables, The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales
    \"Snow Image,\" frontispiece illustration by Frederick Church from vol 3, <I>The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales</I>
    "Snow Image," frontispiece illustration by Frederick Church from vol 3, The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales
    In contrast to the somber gravestone images with which Hawthorne would have been familiar, this image by Frederick Church, which served as the frontispiece illustration from volume 3 of the 1883 Riverside Press edition of The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales captures and innocent spirit that occasionally appears in such pieces as "The Snow Image" and "Little Annie's Ramble." Romanticized and whimsical, the drawing points us to one possible version of Hawthorne's idea of goodness. (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    This illustration which appears opposite the title page of \"The Snow-Image and Other Twice-Told Tales\" and opposite p. 379 in vol. 3 of <I>Seven Gables and The Snow-Image, and other Twice-Told Tales</I> carries a sense of youthful feminine innocence suggestive of the gentle kindness Hawthorne celebrated in characters such as Mary Goffe of \"The Man of Adamant\" and Annie in \"Litte Annie's Ramble.\"
    This illustration which appears opposite the title page of "The Snow-Image and Other Twice-Told Tales" and opposite p. 379 in vol. 3 of Seven Gables and The Snow-Image, and other Twice-Told Tales carries a sense of youthful feminine innocence suggestive of the gentle kindness Hawthorne celebrated in characters such as Mary Goffe of "The Man of Adamant" and Annie in "Litte Annie's Ramble."
    from the 15 vol. 1883 Riverside Press edition of Hawthorne's works. (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
  • From the 1883 Standard Library edition of The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne
    Pandora
    Pandora
    from volume V of the 1883 Standard Library edition of The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne in fifteen volumes  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)

    from volume V of the 1883 Standard Library edition of The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne in fifteen volumes  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
    Book Cover for <i>Hawthorne's Works</i>, Globe Edition
    Book Cover for Hawthorne's Works, Globe Edition
     (courtesy of Terri Whitney)
  • Mosses From An Old Manse, "Salem Edition"
    Cover of Hawthorne's <I/>Mosses From An Old Manse</I>
    Cover of Hawthorne's Mosses From An Old Manse
    "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
  • Twice-Told Tales, "Salem Edition"
    <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>,
    Twice-Told Tales,
    The Cover of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>, the \"Salem Edition,\" 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
    Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
    Title Page of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    The Custom House, Salem
    The Custom House, Salem
    From Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)

 

Objects and Dwellings

Sitting Room in the Wayside
Sitting Room in the Wayside
During the Hawthorne years this was the dining room for the family, as it was during the Alcott years. The fireplace screen was decorated by Rose Hawthorne for Harriett Lothrop. She inscribed a verse from her father's short story, "Fire Worship" in Mosses From an Old Manse: "Beautiful it is to see the strengthening gleam-the deepening light-that gradually casts distinct shadows of the human figure, the table, and the high-backed chairs, upon the opposite wall, and at length, as twilight comes on, replenishes the room with living radiance, and makes life all rose-color." (photography by Rich Murphy)
Mirror like Esther Dudley’s
Mirror like Esther Dudley’s
Mirror such as Esther Dudley may have looked into. (courtesy of The Beverly Historical Society)
Decanter and Glasses in Crowninshield House
Decanter and Glasses in Crowninshield House
Decanter and glasses typical of those in use during time of "Lady Eleanore's Mantle." (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Sitting Room in Crowninshield Bentley House, Salem, MA
Sitting Room in Crowninshield Bentley House, Salem, MA
Sitting room typical of era during which Lady Eleanore's Mantle is set (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Desk in Sitting Room in Crowninshield House
Desk in Sitting Room in Crowninshield House
Desk that appears in sitting room typical of era during which Lady Eleanore's Mantle is set. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Canopy bed in lady's bedroom on second floor of Crowninshield Bentley House
Canopy bed in lady's bedroom on second floor of Crowninshield Bentley House
Crowninshield Bentley House. This room is typical of the room in which Lady Eleanore would have stayed. Its furnishings reflect the degre of comfort to which she would have been accustomed.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Lady's Bedroom in Crowninshield Bentley House
Lady's Bedroom in Crowninshield Bentley House
Crowninshield Bentley House. These elements of decor are typical of those that would have graced the rooms in which Lady Eleanore lived. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Table with mirror and candle in lady's bedroom of Crowninshield Bentley House, Salem, MA
Table with mirror and candle in lady's bedroom of Crowninshield Bentley House, Salem, MA
This mirror is typical of that in which Lady Eleanore might have studied her reflection and admired her appearance. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Plants and Flowers

Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in \"Alice Doane's Appeal\"
Photo copyright Henriette Kress
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in "Alice Doane's Appeal" Photo copyright Henriette Kress
Gov. John Endicott brought Woodwax (or Dyer’s Greenweed) to New England in 1628. The English colonists wanted the yellow-flowering plant to dye wool and flax. It soon became an invasive, alien weed, covering the meadows and hills of the Salem area. It can be found today growing in Salem Woods. (courtesy Henriette's Herbal Home Page, Henriette Kress,http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed )
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in \"Alice Doane's Appeal\")
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in "Alice Doane's Appeal")
Also known as Dyer's Weed, Woad Waxen, and Dyer's Broom (Genista tinctoria).  (courtesy of http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/brodye72.html)

Portraits, Statues, and Monuments

Albertus Magnus(c. 1200-1280; born in Swabia, now Germany and died in Prussia, now Germany) is mentioned by Hawthorne in \"The Birth-mark\" as one of the philosophers of the Middle Ages who \"perhaps imagined themselves, to have acquired from the investigation of nature a power above nature, and from physics a sway over the spiritual world.\"
Albertus Magnus(c. 1200-1280; born in Swabia, now Germany and died in Prussia, now Germany) is mentioned by Hawthorne in "The Birth-mark" as one of the philosophers of the Middle Ages who "perhaps imagined themselves, to have acquired from the investigation of nature a power above nature, and from physics a sway over the spiritual world."
In "The Birth-mark" Georgiana peruses books in Aylmer's scientific library and comes across works by philosophers of the Middle Ages such as Albertus Magnus, Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus, and Friar Bacon, creator of the Brazen Head. (courtesy of University of Saint Andrews, Scotland)
Old Postcard of Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Old Postcard of Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts. (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Hannah Duston Memorial, Penacook, NH.
Old Postcard of the Hannah Duston Memorial, Penacook, NH.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, New Hampshire. (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, New Hampshire. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston was placed at the site of the escape in 1874. The front, or Westerly side of the monument, is inscribd with the following: "Heroum Gesta Fides-Justitia. Hannah Duston Mary Neff, Samuel Leonardson March 30, 1697, Midnight. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire. 
The monument was erected in 1874 on the site of the escape. On the easterly side of the monument, facing the river, the following comment is inscribed: March 15 1697 30. The War-Whoops-Tomahawks-Fagot and Infanticides were at Haverhill, the ashes of the camp-fires at night and ten of the tribe are here. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston holding a hatchet and ten Indian scalps. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire
Granite statue of Hannah Duston. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Duston Memorial, Haverhill (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts website)
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
The monument stands on the site of the Second Church, of which Hannah Duston became a member in 1724.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts 
The Hannah Duston Monument was the first statue erected in the United States to honor a woman.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The original small axe or hatchet held here by Hannah Duston can be found today in the Haverhill Historical Society. The Duston hatchet is not a tomahawk. It is usually called a biscayan or biscayenne, a common trade item of the late seventeenth-century New England frontier. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Close-up of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Close-up of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Monument (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
The capture of Hannah Duston and Mary Neff (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
Hannah Duston's husband defending the Duston children  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
The escape of Hannah Duston, Mary Neff, and Samuel Lenorson (Lennardson) down the Merrimack River  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Fountain in front of Daniel Low Building, 231 Essex Street Mall, built in 1976 on the site of the Town Pump made famous in Hawthorne's sketch, \"A Rill from the Town Pump\"
Fountain in front of Daniel Low Building, 231 Essex Street Mall, built in 1976 on the site of the Town Pump made famous in Hawthorne's sketch, "A Rill from the Town Pump"
In Hawthorne's sketch "A Rill from the Town Pump," his narrator is the Town Pump who offers ostensibly a lecture on temperance but whose clear subtext is a light-hearted satire of vehement advocates of temperance. The sketch is perhaps specifically aimed at George Cheever, pastor of the Howard Street Church,and one such advocate. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Close-up of fountain in front of Daniel Low Building, 231 Essex Street Mall, built in 1976 on the site of the Town Pump made famous in Hawthorne's sketch, \"A Rill from the Town Pump\"
Close-up of fountain in front of Daniel Low Building, 231 Essex Street Mall, built in 1976 on the site of the Town Pump made famous in Hawthorne's sketch, "A Rill from the Town Pump"
In Hawthorne's sketch "A Rill from the Town Pump," his narrator is the Town Pump who offers ostensibly a lecture on temperance but whose clear subtext is a light-hearted satire of vehement advocates of temperance. The sketch is perhaps specifically aimed at George Cheever, pastor of the Howard Street Church,and one such advocate.  (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
 

Criticism Related to Hawthorne's Short Stories and Sketches

Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from <I>Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,</i> frontispiece
Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,frontispiece (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
 

Lectures and Articles Related to the Short Stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from <I>Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales,</i> frontispiece
Illustration for "Lady Eleanore’s Mantle" from Hawthorne’s Works, vol. 1, Twice-Told Tales, frontispiece (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)